JEB desktop wallpaper calendar 2016

JEB desktop wallpaper calendar 2016

Drosophila fly straight by fixating objects in the face of expanding optic flow
Michael B. Reiser, Michael H. Dickinson

SUMMARY

Flies, like all animals that depend on vision to navigate through the world, must integrate the optic flow created by self-motion with the images generated by prominent features in their environment. Although much is known about the responses of Drosophila melanogaster to rotating flow fields, their reactions to the more complex patterns of motion that occur as they translate through the world are not well understood. In the present study we explore the interactions between two visual reflexes in Drosophila: object fixation and expansion avoidance. As a fly flies forward, it encounters an expanding visual flow field. However, recent results have demonstrated that Drosophila strongly turn away from patterns of expansion. Given the strength of this reflex, it is difficult to explain how flies make forward progress through a visual landscape. This paradox is partially resolved by the finding reported here that when undergoing flight directed towards a conspicuous object, Drosophila will tolerate a level of expansion that would otherwise induce avoidance. This navigation strategy allows flies to fly straight when orienting towards prominent visual features.

  • LIST OF ABBREVIATIONS

    CL
    contrast level
    ER
    expansion-rotation (pattern)
    FD
    figure detection
    FOC
    focus of contraction
    FOE
    focus of expansion
    ft
    temporal frequency
    LED
    light-emitting diode
    L–R
    difference between left and right wingbeat amplitudes
  • View Full Text